Activities for the kids of the Twin Cities: birds (watching, listening and adopting)

Birds can be black and white
source: Charles McKeddie
or colorful
Source: Scott Lamont
Birds can be small
Source: Ken Goh

or large

source: Kim's Pics :)
They can be forest birds

Source:  Jeff Dyck

or seabirds

Source: Tim Melling
Birds are fascinating to watch, no matter their size, color or the way they sing and kids love them.  Watching and listening to birds is not only entertaining but also educational, as they are a great way to connect to science, nature and the outdoors. Take your kids to the Minnesota ZOO or Como Park Zoo & Conservatory to see the birds and you'll help them improve their
-observation skills as they to spot a certain type of bird
-listening skills as they identify birds by their songs
-patience as they wait for birds to appear
-deduction as they compare two species of birds
Here are also two bird activities that will take place in the month of January:
1. Winter Birding (Grades 3 to 8)  with Lauren Borer at the Twin Cities Environmental Education Consulting
Not all birds migrate south for the winter. Some are bold enough to stick around through our cold Minnesota winters! Learn how to recognize our year round birds by sight and sound. Find out how they are able to survive the bitter cold and where they find food in the winter. We will explore wetland areas and along the Mississippi River to find these hardy birds! 

When: Monday, January 19th from 10:00-11:30am
Location: Coon Rapids Dam Regional Park, Brooklyn Park
Cost: $12/student

2. BRR, BRR BIRDIE (ages 3-5) at the Maplewood Nature Center
DeeDee the chickadee puppet will help you learn all about  Minnesota birds.  Make a pine cone birdfeeder to take home.

 When: Tuesday, January 20, 10:30AM - 11:30 AM
 Cost: $4.00 per child.   

One of the best ways to get your little one in close contact with a bird is to take care of one. If you consider getting a bird pet for your child, you may want to visit the Animal Humane Society (there are several locations around the metro).  Another way would be, as suggested in a previous post, to get a bird feeder and observe birds right into your own backyard. 


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